Kitchen Lake Park

Kitchen Lake Park  located on the southeastern edge of Oklahoma City has long been a fishing destination.  The first phase of a planned regional park, the improvements to the initial 10 acre plot had a simple goal: creating accessible parking and pathways.

 

Utilizing watershed data and the necessity to protect the water body, the entry road and parking lot were designed to capture rainfall and channel it into a central bioretention cell. Water collected from the impervious surfaces is channeled to the cell and then piped to a series of open air ephemeral pools.  Water then flows into the lake.

 

Carving the park out of a healthy short grass prairie ecosystem provided ample justification to utilize hyroseeding technology in conjunction with erosion control blankets to vegetate the site.  A mix of short grass natives such as little bluestem, big bluestem, indian grass, side oats gramma, and switch grass were used.  Additionally, wildflowers such coreopsis, coneflowers, and maiximilian sunflowers were added to complete the system of short grass prairie plants.  Over time the site will require minimal maintenance and retain its wild character.

Year: 2014

 

Size: 10 acres

 

Budget: $850,000.00

 

Completed while employed

by the OKC Parks and Recreation Department

 

LAUD Studio

2426 Classen Blvd

Oklahoma City, OK 73106

 

info@laudstudio.com

405.420.8800

Copyright© 2016 LAUD Studio LLC

Kitchen Lake Park  located on the southeastern edge of Oklahoma City has long been a fishing destination.  The first phase of a planned regional park, the improvements to the initial 10 acre plot had a simple goal: creating accessible parking and pathways.

 

Utilizing watershed data and the necessity to protect the water body, the entry road and parking lot were designed to capture rainfall and channel it into a central bioretention cell. Water collected from the impervious surfaces is channeled to the cell and then piped to a series of open air ephemeral pools.  Water then flows into the lake.

 

Carving the park out of a healthy short grass prairie ecosystem provided ample justification to utilize hyroseeding technology in conjunction with erosion control blankets to vegetate the site.  A mix of short grass natives such as little bluestem, big bluestem, indian grass, side oats gramma, and switch grass were used.  Additionally, wildflowers such coreopsis, coneflowers, and maiximilian sunflowers were added to complete the system of short grass prairie plants.  Over time the site will require minimal maintenance and retain its wild character.

 

Year: 2014

 

Size: 10 acres

 

Budget: $850,000.00

 

Completed while employed

by the OKC Parks and Recreation Department